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CDR Sample for Transport Engineer

CDR Sample for Transport Engineer

You can get 100% genuine CDR Sample for Transport Engineer written by our professional and skilled engineering writers. The samples we provide are the report which have already been submitted and positively assessed by the Engineers Australia for Skilled Migration Visa. Please use the sample for reference purpose only and do not copy and paste from the sample.

CDR Report Sample: Transport Engineer

ANZSCO Code: 233215

CDR Sample for Transport Engineer includes all the necessary reports such as Three Career EpisodesContinuing Professional Development, Summary Statement and Curriculum Vitae. The Content of the CDR Report Sample is as follows:

  • ➝ Curriculum Vitae: Resume based on a professional template.
  • ➝ Continuing Professional Development Sample: CPD Sample clearly explains the author’s  Engineering Knowledge- 1000 words.
  • ➝ Transport Engineer Career Episode Sample – 1: “Application of Multi-Hazard Seismic-Blast Detailing for Highway Bridges”- 1850 words.
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  • ➝ Transport Engineer Career Episode Sample – 2:“Vertical Transport Evacuation Modelling”- 1700 words.
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  • ➝ Transport Engineer Career Episode Sample – 3: “Increased Span Length for the MGS Long-Span Guardrail System”- 2100 words.
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  • ➝ Transport Engineer Summary Statement Sample: Detail explanation of all the competency element- 1500 words.

Transport Engineer Career Episode Report: Sample 1

Project Name: Application of Multi-Hazard Seismic-Blast Detailing for Highway Bridges

In first career episode, the author describes the project he did when he was studying Bachelor degree in Transport Engineering.The project’s name was “Application of Multi-Hazard Seismic-Blast Detailing for Highway Bridges”. The responsibilities of the author were:

  • ➝ To investigate blast load effects on a typical highway bridge in the United States
  • ➝ To identify typical mechanisms responsible for causing damage/failure of bridge components
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  • ➝ To study the correlations between seismic design for blast load effects
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  • ➝ To present a hypothetical bridge target subjected to various levels of blast loading to investigate blast-induced failure mechanisms
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  • ➝ To discuss the application of seismic detailing for blast-induced highway bridges

Transport Engineer Career Episode Report: Sample 2

Project Name: Vertical Transport Evacuation Modelling

In second Career Episode, the author explains the engineering skills he used in the project he was involved in a for a duration of 5 months as a final year student. His duties and responsibilities in the project “Vertical Transport Evacuation Modelling” were:

  • ➝ To investigate blast load effects on a typical highway bridge in the United States
  • ➝ To identify typical mechanisms responsible for causing damage/failure of bridge components
  • ➝ To study the correlations between seismic design for blast load effects
  • ➝ To present a hypothetical bridge target subjected to various levels of blast loading to investigate blast-induced failure mechanisms
  • ➝ To discuss the application of seismic detailing for blast-induced highway bridges

Transport Engineer Career Episode Report: Sample 3

Project Name: Increased Span Length for the MGS Long-Span Guardrail System

In third Career Episode, the author demonstrates his technical skills he used to complete the project he was involved in as an assignment project during his university study. The Project was “Increased Span Length for the MGS Long-Span Guardrail System”. The key responsibility of the writer was:

  • ➝ To perform a detailed analysis of the MGS long-span guardrail system using the finite element software program LS-DYNA
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  • ➝ To design and evaluate the structural capacity of the MGS long-span guardrail system at increased span lengths
  • ➝ To determine maximum unsupported span length for the current long-span design
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  • ➝ To evaluate potential modifications that may allow for significantly for longer unsupported spans
  • ➝ To meet the Test Level 3 (TL-3) safety criteria set forth by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) in their Manual for Assessing Safety Hardware (MASH)

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